The Surprising Effects of Exposure to Air Pollution

Everyone knows that air pollution affects the lungs. But how much do you know about the impact it has on the cardiovascular system?

Discover some of the lesser-known, more surprising effects of traffic pollution when Dr. Sverre Vedal presents the 2014 Joseph V Scaletti Catalyst Lecture at noon on Friday April 4 2014 at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine.

Dr. Vedal directs the University of Washington Center for Clean Air Research (UW CCAR) a multi-institutional center focused on the cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution, defined as a complex mixture of components that come from vehicle emissions and the road surface, which vary with the age of the road surface, atmospheric conditions, and photochemical reactions.

Professor of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences and Adjunct Professor of General Internal Medicine at the University of Washington, Dr. Vedal has an MD from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, a master’s in epidemiology from Harvard, and bachelor’s degree in philosophy from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

ScalettiPoster-2014_1Dr. Vedal has published research linking air pollution to hardening of the arteries, directs the Center for Clean Air Research, served as a member of the EPA Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC), currently serves as a member of CASAC panels for particulate matter and ozone and the NIH Infectious, Reproductive, Asthma and Pulmonary Conditions (IRAP) Study Section, and sees patients in the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Clinic at Harborview Medical Center.

In 2011, Dr Vedal was invited to present the Distinguished Faculty Lecture at the University of Washington School of Public Health; the title of that talk was Air Pollution: Can it really be that bad for us?

Each year, the Joseph V. Scaletti Catalyst Lecture features an individual, institution, or idea responsible for accelerating the rate of positive change and forward progress in the areas of biomedical research, healthcare education, or healthcare delivery. In recognition of his work as a practicing physician, a biomedical researcher, and an active advocate for quantifying the impact of environmental pollutants on human health, Dr. Sverre Vedal has been invited to present this year’s Joseph V Scaletti Catalyst Lecture.

 

Friday, April 4, 2014
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Domenici Center Auditorium
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center
 

The Joseph V. Scaletti Catalyst Lecture: A Public Forum for Envisioning the Future of Biomedical Research and Innovative Models for Healthcare Education and Delivery

Ramalho-Ortigao to present 2013 Catalyst Lecture

Sand Fly-Leishmania Interactions: Applying what we know

Entomologist/molecular biologist Marcelo Ramalho-Ortigao takes a comprehensive approach to Leishmaniasis, integrating research at the molecular level, with research on the responses of individual vertebrates to the disease, and extending into biogeographic studies of how land-use policies may affect the spread of disease, with the ultimate goal of furthering our understanding of the vector-pathogen interaction in general.

Leishmaniasis is a disease caused by the parasitic protozoan Leishmania and is transmitted by the bite of the female sandfly. The disease takes two forms, Cutaneous leishmanaisis which affects the skin and mucous membranes and, more severely, Visceral leishmanaisis in which the parasites migrate to the vital organs.

As principal investigator in the Department of Entomology’s Biology of Disease Vectors Laboratory at Kansas State University, Dr Marcelo Ramalho-Ortigao’s research focuses on the primary vector for this disease: the sand fly. He has demonstrated that, by targeting vector molecules, he can interfere with pathogen development within the vector, opening some new avenues for exciting future discoveries.

Dr Ramalho-Ortigao (center) in his lab: From L to R 1st row Nathan Elliott (MS student, summer NIH-ARRA intern), Dr. Ortigao, Dr. Narinder Sharma (posdoc), Iliano Coutinho-Abreu (PhD candidate); 2nd row Emma Hayes (MS student, summer NIH-ARRA intern), Maricela Robles-Murguia (Lab tech). Two students are not pictured: Leah Cox (MS student), and Shawna (undergrad). Photo from Biotekchina.com.cn

It’s this potential for Dr Ramalho-Ortigao’s approach to catalyze new research discoveries related to the prevention and treatment of this neglected tropical disease, that resulted in an invitation to present this year’s Joseph V. Scaletti Catalyst Lecture. Each year, the Catalyst Lecture features an individual, institution, or idea responsible for accelerating the rate of positive change and forward progress in the areas of biomedical research, healthcare education, or healthcare delivery. The lecture series honors the work and ideals of one of the founders of the UNM School of Medicine, microbiologist Dr Joseph V Scaletti.

Scheduled for 12 noon on April 12, 2013, Dr Ramalho-Ortigao’s talk, Sand Fly-Leishmania Interactions: Applying What We Know will cover various aspects of molecular interactions of the sand fly and Leishmania – focusing on the midgut of the vector, including details of midgut targets that might be used in prevention of disease transmission by sand flies, as well as basic biological functions of the disease.

Friday, April 12, 2013
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Domenici Center Auditorium
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center
 

The Joseph V. Scaletti Catalyst Lecture: A Public Forum for Envisioning the Future of Biomedical Research, and Innovative Models for Healthcare Education and Delivery

A New Approach to Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC)

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major cause of injury and death in premature newborns, affecting nearly 10% of infants born prematurely or with low birth weight. In spite of numerous studies over the years, it has been difficult to track down a single unifying cause for this disease. Last year, however, Dr. Akhil Maheshwari, physician and researcher at the University of Illinois Chicago College of Medicine, made a discovery that has exciting potential applications in the early diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

 

 

During NEC, bacteria in the baby’s intestine trigger a strong inflammatory response causing tissue damage. This is somewhat surprising when you consider that, as adults, each of us normally carries trillions of bacteria in our large intestines, all of which stay in perfect harmony with the host in a mutually beneficial relationship.

Maheshwari and his colleagues wondered how this could be possible.  He postulated that (1) the mature intestine must have developed ways to adapt to the huge load of immunostimulatory bacteria in the gut lumen, minimizing adverse inflammatory responses to these bacteria and their products, and (2) these mechanisms for the normal suppression of inflammation are not yet in place in the premature intestine.

This line of reasoning could go a long way toward explaining why NEC is associated with several, diverse causes of gut injury, seemingly lacking any common thread.  Instead we can now envision it, not as single disease entity, but as a generic response of the developing intestinal tissue to diverse forms of injury.

This new theory led Dr Maheshwari and colleagues to examine the differences between the premature and the adult intestine.  What they discovered is that the developing intestine lacks a protein, called transforming growth factor-beta 2, that trains the host defense mechanisms in the intestine to minimize the inflammatory responses while still maintaining mechanisms for eliminating wayward bacteria.

This discovery raises exciting possibilities both for early diagnosis of NEC and for developing novel ways to treat this disease.

In the 2012 Joseph V. Scaletti Memorial Catalyst Lecture, Dr Maheshwari focuses on unique aspects of inflammation in the premature intestine and outlines potential mechanisms for correcting areas of imbalance for both preventative and therapeutic purposes.

Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis: Tissue Injury Response of the Developing Intestine to Diverse Forms of Injury
 Friday, April 6, 2012
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Domenici Center Auditorium
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center
 
The Joseph V. Scaletti Catalyst Lecture: A Public Forum for Envisioning the Future of Biomedical Research, and Innovative Models for Healthcare Education and Delivery

Neonatal Gastrointestinal Disease Researcher to present 2012 Catalyst Lecture

A physician/researcher specializing in neonatal intensive care and immune disorders,  Dr. Akhil Maheshwari, of the University of Illinois-Chicago College of Medicine, has been invited to present the 2012 Joseph V. Scaletti Catalyst Lecture on Apr 06 12:00 PM in Domenici Center Auditorium on the campus of the Health Sciences Center of the University of New Mexico.

A practicing physician specializing in neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis and developmental gastroenterology, Dr Maheshwari is also deeply committed to basic research and the training of physicians, physician-scientists, and basic scientists; his research focuses on the mechanisms of inflammatory gut injury in neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis with specific focus on leukocyte trafficking, tight junctions, and macrophage function.

Some of Dr Maheshwari’s recent research published with colleagues includes:  TGF-β2 Suppresses Macrophage Cytokine Production in the Developing Intestine and Protects against Experimental Necrotizing EnterocolitisT cell cytokines and the risk of blood stream infection in extremely low birth weight infants, Probiotic Bacteria Induce Maturation of Intestinal Claudin 3 Expression and Barrier Function, and Do Red Cell Transfusions Increase the Risk of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Premature Infants?

 

Each year, one of the Signature Research Programs at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine selects an outstanding physician/researcher whose work embodies the ideals of Clinical/Translational Research with immediate “bench to bedside” impact on the community to present the Joseph V Scaletti Memorial Catalyst Lecture. The Signature Research Programs are focused on critical health problems affecting New Mexico residents and seek to bridge the clinical and basic sciences in order to more rapidly deliver discoveries in molecular medicine to the clinical setting. This year, Child Health, the newest Signature Research Program, has invited Dr Maheshwari: Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Pharmacology, Division of Neonatology Chief, Program Director of the Neonatal Fellowship Program, Director for Neonatal and Pediatric Gastrointestinal Disease, and Medical Director of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Intermediate Care Nursery at the University of Illinois Children’s Hospital.

Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis: Tissue Injury Response of the Developing Intestine to Diverse Forms of Injury
 Friday, April 6, 2012
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Domenici Center Auditorium
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center
 
The Joseph V. Scaletti Catalyst Lecture: A Public Forum for Envisioning the Future of Biomedical Research, and Innovative Models for Healthcare Education and Delivery



Inaugural Joseph V. Scaletti Catalyst Lecture

The Pharmacogenetics of Asthma
Progress toward Personalized Medicine
Kelan Tantisira, M.D., M.P.H.
Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School
Associate Physician, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
The inaugural lecture in the annual Joseph V. Scaletti Memorial Catalyst Lecture series was presented by Kelan Tantisira, MD MPH.  Dr. Tantisira’s research centers on the pharmacogenetics of asthma. Pharmacogenetics promises to revolutionize the treatment of disease by tailoring the treatment to each individual, based upon that individual’s genetic makeup.  Pharmacogenetics is already improving drug safety, increasing the effectiveness of existing drug treatments, and aiding in the discovery of new drugs by taking the uniqueness of each individual patient’s potential response to the drug into account.
An introductory tribute to Dr Joseph V. Scaletti was presented by Philip Eaton, MD, Emeritus Executive Vice President for Health Sciences.

 

 

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Domenici Center Auditorium
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center
 

The Joseph V. Scaletti Catalyst Lecture: A Public Forum for Envisioning the Future of Biomedical Research, and Innovative Models for Healthcare Education and Delivery

 

 

 

 

 

First Annual Joseph V Scaletti “Catalyst Lecture” Poster

(Click for a full-sized image)

Asthma and the Personalized Medicine Revolution

Harvard Researcher to Present Inaugural Joseph V Scaletti ‘Catalyst’ Lecture at UNM School of Medicine

Albuquerque, New Mexico, April 13, 2011 – Harvard Medical School faculty member and Brigham & Women’s hospital physician Dr. Kelan Tantisira will be at the University of New Mexico Wednesday April 13, 2011 to present the inaugural lecture in the annual Joseph V. Scaletti Memorial ‘Catalyst’ Lecture series:”The Pharmacogenetics of Asthma: Progress toward Personalized Medicine”. An introductory tribute to Dr Joseph V. Scaletti, one the founders of UNM’s School of Medicine, will be presented by Philip Eaton, MD, Emeritus Executive Vice President for Health Sciences.

Treating the Patient, not the Disease

In a traditional medical education, students have been taught in terms of the average person and the classic case.  But in the real world, there is no such patient. Each case is unique because each person’s genome is unique.

Most of us have had some experience with the fact that drugs can affect different people in different ways.  Pharmacogenetics, the study of how an individual’s genetic makeup can impact the effectiveness of a particular drug treatment, promises to revolutionize the practice of medicine by making it possible to tailor the treatment of a disease to each individual patient. This is what Dr. Tantisira calls “the Personalized Medicine Revolution”.

Asthma, drug therapy, and genetics

Asthma affects 300 million individuals worldwide, a number that is expected to grow to 400 million by 2025. Asthma is primarily a children’s disease, the majority of sufferers being under 17 years of age. In the US alone, about $20 billion is spent each year treating asthma, with about 40% of that amount going toward drug therapies. Yet, despite the $8 billion a year that Americans spend on asthma drugs, only about 60% of patients respond to those drugs.

If we could know in advance, through genetic testing, which asthma drugs are likely to work best for each patient, it could save time and resources, avoid unnecessary side-effects, and point the way toward understanding the causes of asthma and developing more effective drugs and other therapies in the future.

(http://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/full/10.2217/14622416.9.7.805)

Dr. Tantisira’s research focuses on how specific variations in a patient’s genome are associated with how well that patient will respond to commonly used asthma drug treatments (bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), and leukotriene modifiers.)  These genetic variations may also point the way to understanding the underlying causes of asthma and developing new treatments for this disease in the future.

Translational Medicine

Dr. Tantisira’s lecture is being hosted by the Clinical & Translational Science Center (CTSC) at UNM, part of a new nationwide initiative to speed up the transfer of discoveries from basic biomedical research directly to those who are caring for patients, resulting in immediate improvements in health outcomes.

Before scientific research can improve human health, research results must be translated from the lab bench to the patient’s bedside.  This so-called bench-to-bedside transition requires two-way communication.  Basic biomedical researchers can provide clinicians with new tools for fighting disease, and clinicians provide feedback and novel observations on the progression of disease that can guide the researchers’ basic investigations.  One of the goals of the CTSC is to facilitate this two-way conversation and speed of the flow of information in both directions to improve the quality of health care.

http://commonfund.nih.gov/clinicalresearch/overview-translational.aspx

An individual like Kelan Tantisira, who is both a practicing physician and a basic researcher, embodies both roles and can serve as a role model for students at the University of New Mexico who are being trained to practice the medicine and basic biomedical research of the future.

http://pulmonaryfellowship.hms.harvard.edu/NewFiles/Staff/FacultyTantisira.html

The Dr. Joseph V. Scaletti Memorial ‘Catalyst Lectures’

Described as “a Public Forum for Envisioning the Future of Biomedical Research, and Innovative Models for Healthcare Education and Delivery” the annual Joseph V. Scaletti Catalyst Lecture features an individual, institution, or idea responsible for accelerating the rate of positive change and forward progress in the areas of biomedical research, healthcare education, or healthcare delivery.

These lectures are presented in honor of the late Dr Joseph V. Scaletti, PhD, one of the founders of the University of New Mexico School of Medicine; UNM’s first Vice President for Research; creator of the Allied Health Sciences program; organizer of the first Rural Health Interdisciplinary Program; chair of the first legislative committee on distance education and telehealth; co-founder of Project ECHO which uses telemedicine to treat chronic diseases in rural New Mexico; educator, mentor, and researcher.

Details and contact information

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Domenici Center Auditorium (http://bit.ly/eUGMG9)
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center

The Dr. Joseph V. Scaletti Memorial ‘Catalyst Lectures’

A Public Forum for Envisioning the Future of Biomedical Research, and Innovative Models for Healthcare Education and Delivery

Each year, the Joseph V. Scaletti Catalyst Lecture features an individual, institution, or idea responsible for accelerating the rate of positive change and forward progress in the areas of biomedical research, healthcare education, or healthcare delivery.

Hosted by the UNM HSC Clinical & Translational Science Center (CTSC), these lectures are presented in honor of Dr Joseph V. Scaletti, PhD, one of the founders of the University of New Mexico School of Medicine; UNM’s first Vice President for Research; creator of the Allied Health Sciences program; organizer of the first Rural Health Interdisciplinary Program; chair of the first legislative committee on distance education and telehealth; co-founder of Project ECHO; educator, mentor, and researcher.

Dr Scaletti’s talent for bringing together individuals and institutions and inspiring new initiatives and collaborations prompted some of his colleagues to describe him as a catalyst (to which he would reply with a smile, “I prefer to think of myself as an enzyme.”)

Dr Scaletti dedicated his 50+ year career to basic biomedical research and to envisioning and implementing innovative models for university-community collaboration and the education of healthcare professionals who would serve in and care for the residents of New Mexico. His work exemplifies the combined values of basic scientific research, human compassion, life-long learning, and service to the community. In the words of his colleague and self-professed “product of Joe Scaletti’s mentoring”, L. Clark Hansbarger, MD:

Joe Scaletti was one of those very rare individuals who had a proactive approach to every element of health education resulting in a constant dedication to a vision for the future. Whether it was a test tube, a computer, a curriculum or facility, he had a vision for its application tomorrow and set to work to do it today. And although he had amazing instincts, it was his dedication to data, organizational planning, mentoring and sharing of information that made him a successful “futurist”.

Goals:

To provide a forum for School of Medicine faculty, students, administrators, community members, and invited speakers to envision the future, to engage in discussions, to question the status quo, and to create new initiatives for solving the most pressing challenges in biomedical research, healthcare and healthcare education;

To assist the School of Medicine in inviting dynamic, challenging, enthusiastic individuals to the campus who may act as a spark or impetus to trigger new ideas and inspire further ongoing interactions and collaboration;

To ensure that, even in difficult economic times, the faculty and students of the School of Medicine will always have an opportunity to reflect on the larger issues, to think creatively about the future, to refresh their spirits and renew their idealism;

To further increase the visibility of the School of Medicine in the community at large (both in New Mexico and beyond), to further encourage community confidence and enthusiasm for the School of Medicine and its teaching hospital as a center where gifted expert healthcare professionals are inventing the future of medicine;

To honor the memory and ideas of Joseph V. Scaletti and to promote the values that he worked to advance throughout his life.

Selection

Each year, the School of Medicine at the University of New Mexico invites a lecturer at the forefront of biomedical research and/or alternative approaches to education in the health sciences (where ‘education’ is defined as a lifelong pursuit, including but not limited to the years of formal education at the university or professional school) or health care delivery.

The approach could include innovative training or curricula; it could also include new models for post-graduate continuing education or more efficient models for healthcare delivery, such as the ECHO model. Or it could introduce a new result from basic biomedical research or a new technological breakthrough that has the potential to completely change the way healthcare is delivered in the future. It should be an approach that challenges the status quo but which is already producing promising results supported by measurable outcomes.

The goal is to, once a year, bring in a speaker who has ideas that, even if not universally accepted, will stimulate discussions and encourage students, faculty and administrators to brainstorm about alternative solutions to the most pressing problems of the time.

The visiting lecturer will present a free, open to the public, lecture on the Health Sciences Campus with community participation and visitors from other New Mexico communities and campuses strongly encouraged.

Each year the lecture will include a brief introduction describing Joseph Scaletti’s career-long ideals and the goals for these lectures.

The visitor is also invited to interact with smaller groups of UNM School of Medicine students, administrators, visitors from other campuses and health facilities, and faculty (possibilities include research seminar, grand rounds, one-on-one meetings with students or student groups, assisting clinical faculty, meeting with administrators.

Scheduled Lectures:

2011: The Pharmocogentics of Asthma: Progress Towards Personalized Medicine, Kelan Tantisira, M.D., M.P.H.

Contribute to the lecture fund

Awards

The Regents of the University of New Mexico and the Dean of the School of Medicine had both planned to present recognition awards to Joseph Scaletti in the spring and fall of 2010, respectively. After the accident that caused his death in March 2010, both parties chose to go forward with their plans to recognize his work, and they presented the awards to his family in his memory:

The University of New Mexico Board of Regents Meritorious Service Award 2010

The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Legacy Award

After his death, Joseph Scaletti was also honored for his support of Casa Esperanza (a home away from home for cancer patients and their families), by being named an Amigo de Casa:

For his contributions to Polio eradication and for spearheading a Hepatitis C Awareness campaign, Joseph Scaletti was named a Legend of Rotary by the Albuquerque Rotary Club:

Memorial Service Photos & Videos

JVS_Memorial_1For photographs and video clips from the May 8, 2010 memorial service and reception honoring Joseph V. Scaletti, please visit the new Memorial page.

Happy Father’s Day, Dad!